Gynecological Services

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Patient Eligibility

  • University of Nebraska-Lincoln students
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Hours of Service

Monday and Thursday: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Tuesday and Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday: Closed

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Services Covered By Student Fees

  • Five “talking” office visits with a Medical or Travel Clinic provider every July through June (Example: Talking with a provider about a medical concern such as a cough that won’t go away, a rash that recently developed or unexplained pain in an area of the body. Immunizations, laboratory services, medical procedures, physical therapy, preventative exams, prescriptions, psychiatric visits, routine physicals, specialty visits and X-rays are not covered.)

Inclusive, Comprehensive Gynecological Services

No matter your gender identity, if you have a vagina, uterus or breasts, we encourage you to have a routine wellness exam and seek problem-focused care with us when needed. Nebraska Medicine doctors, advanced practice registered nurses and physician assistants specialize in providing gynecologic care and look forward to helping you stay well.

Our services:

  • Annual Gynecological Exams
  • Birth Control and Contraception
  • Sexually Transmitted Infection Testing
  • HPV Vaccine
  • Pregnancy Testing, Counseling and Referrals
  • Treatment for Pain and Infections

Appointments

Services are open to UNL students only and are available from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays and Tuesdays, 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturdays. A doctor’s referral is not required to be seen.

You should not be menstruating on the day of your exam and should call 402-472-5000 to reschedule your appointment if you are menstruating. Avoid penetrative sexual intercourse, tampon use, douching and vaginal medications at least two days prior to your visit. Come prepared to share the first day of your last menstrual period and any other notable changes to or concerns you have about your menstrual cycle.

Cost

Most gynecological visits are not covered by student fees and will incur a charge. To determine how much your visit will cost, we recommend contacting your health insurance provider for coverage information. Patients are responsible for any charges not covered by insurance.

Click here to learn more about cost and insurance.

Annual Gynecological Exams

A nurse will collect your vitals and lead you to your exam room, where you will be asked to change into a cloth bib and sheet for your waist. The provider will begin the exam with a discussion of your family and sexual history.Based on your age and risk factors, your provider will then discuss a variety of health topics with you, such as sexually transmitted infection testing and contraception. Be prepared to share the first day of your last menstrual period and any other notable changes to or concern you have about your menstrual cycle. Patients are encouraged to ask their medical provider any questions.

Your provider will check your thyroid, heart, lungs and stomach for any abnormalities and perform a breast exam. During the breast exam, your provider will check for lumps and bumps and explain how you can perform a breast self-exam regularly at home. It may surprise you that it is possible for breast cancer to develop as a young adult, which is why our providers encourage everyone to become familiar with their breasts, learn what is normal for them and learn how to spot any changes.

Next, your provider will perform a pelvic exam. You will be asked to lie down on the exam table and put your heels in heel holders so that she or he can exam the vagina, cervix and reproductive organs. The provider will insert a speculum into the vagina to gently spread the walls apart and examine the area.The exam only takes a few minutes and should not be painful. If your exam includes a pap test or sexually transmitted infection test, the provider will briefly insert a wand into your cervix before removing the speculum. In the case of a pap test, the wand will be sent to the laboratory to check for abnormal cells in the cervix that could lead to cancer. The provider will insert two lubricated, gloved fingers into your vagina and use the other hand to press on the outside of your lower abdomen to check your pelvic organs for any tender areas or unusual growths.

Although it may feel awkward, it is critical that you be open and honest with your provider throughout the exam so that she or he can provide the best care possible for your needs. You will not be judged for your questions or sexual practices; our providers are used to discussing these topics with students, so don’t feel shy or apprehensive.

Birth Control and Contraception

Contraception is much more than just condoms. The pill? The patch? An IUD? How can you choose the right birth control method for your needs? Our providers can provide the education you need to make the best decision for your lifestyle.

The Pill

We provide prescriptions for oral contraceptive pills, which can be filled at the University Health Center pharmacy or another pharmacy of your choosing.

Emergency Contraception

This pill can stop a pregnancy before it starts. Emergency contraception is available at the health center pharmacy; no prescription is needed.

Condoms

We provide free cover-it kits with condoms and lubricant. We also can direct you to the Women's Center and LGBTQA+ Resource Center for free safer sex supplies and to the health center pharmacy for condoms for purchase.

Intrauterine Device

An IUD is a small, flexible contraceptive device that is inserted into the uterus. We provide prescriptions and insertions for IUD, such as Mirena, Skyla and more. Click here for more information.

Nexplanon

This implant is small, thin and flexible and can be placed discreetly under the skin of your inner, upper arm. We can prescribe and insert Nexplanon at the health center. Click here for more information.

Injectable Hormones (Depo Provera Injection)

This shot can be given every three months and is available at the health center. Click here for more information.

NuvaRing

This ring is a small, flexible ring that can be inserted into the vagina for three weeks to prevent your ovaries from releasing eggs. Click here for more information.
If there are any contraceptive services we do not offer or if you cannot afford contraceptive services at the health center, we can refer you to community resources that can assist you.

HPV Vaccine

Human papillomavirus vaccine is important because it protects against cancers caused by HPV infection. HPV is a very common virus and can cause cervical, vaginal and vulvar cancers in women and anal cancer, cancer of the back of the throat (oropharynx) and genital warts in both men and women.

Though it’s recommended to get the HPV vaccine at age 11 or 12, people of all genders can get HPV through age 26. The vaccine is given in three shots. The second shot is given one to two months after the first shot and the third shot is given six months after the first shot. Click here to learn more about the vaccine

Pregnancy Testing, Counseling, and Referrals

Patients can self-order pregnancy tests from the health center lab Monday through Friday during normal business hours. No appointment is needed, but you must check in at the front desk. If a patient prefers a serum pregnancy test, she must make an appointment with a provider by calling 402-472-5000.

Patients must make an appointment with nurse service to receive the results of the pregnancy test. Patients with positive test results will be instructed on available pregnancy care options. Both urine and serum tests will incur a charge.

The health center does not currently provide obstetric, abortion or family planning services, but we can refer patients to community resources that can assist with your needs.

Need help understanding pregnancy tests? Click here for more information

Resources

Sexually Transmitted Infection Testing

Gynecological exams regularly screen and tests for STIs such as:

  • Chlamydia/gonorrhea
  • Herpes
  • HPV
  • Syphilis
  • Hepatitis B and C
  • HIV
  • And more
Visit our sexual health page (to learn more about what you should know about getting tested for STIs.

Treatment for Pain and Infections

Our provider can diagnose and treat

We provide treatment and evaluation of abnormal pap tests. If you have an abnormal pap test, we may recommend a colposcopy, a procedure to closely examine the cervix, vagina and vulva for signs of disease.

Frequently Asked Questions

How often do I need a gynecological exam?

Pelvic exams should begin at age 21 or earlier if you are experiencing any pain or concerns and should be scheduled annually. Pap tests should also begin at age 21 and should be scheduled every three years so long as you do not have any abnormal results..

Do you talk about contraception, birth control and STIs during a gynecological exam?

Yes, we discuss contraception, including birth control pills, condoms, IUDs, implanted devices and NuvaRings. We also discuss STIs, including how to prevent, test for and treat them.

Will we talk about my period at a gynecological exam?

Yes, we will discuss how long your cycle is, how regular your cycles are, how heavy your flow is, and if you have any pain or discomfort during your periods.

Should I see the same provider every year?

If you scheduled a visit with a provider and feel comfortable seeing them again, we encourage you to schedule an appointment with them again so that you can continue building trust and honesty.

I missed my period. Now what?

This is a good time to make an appointment with the health center. There are many reasons why you may have missed your period, and our providers can help you find answers. You may be asked to complete a pregnancy test. Once pregnancy has been ruled out, other factors will be considered, such as stress levels, medications, change in health behavior or habits, etc.

How do I get a pregnancy test at the University Health Center?

Patients can self-order pregnancy tests from the health center lab Monday through Friday during normal business hours. No appointment is needed, but you must check in at the front desk. If a patient prefers a serum pregnancy test, she must make an appointment with a provider by calling 402-472-5000. Patients must make an appointment with the nurse service to receive the results of the pregnancy test. Patients with positive test results will be instructed on available pregnancy care options. Both urine and serum tests will incur a charge.

I think I may be pregnant. What should I do next?

The first step is to take a urine pregnancy test. Most urine pregnancy tests will be accurate beginning the first day of your missed period. If you have a positive test, make an appointment with the health center. Partners are welcome to attend the visit with you. During your appointment, our providers will discuss your options so that you can make the best decision for your needs, values and personal beliefs. No attempt will be made to influence your decision. Pregnancy can result in three outcomes: Birth and parenting, birth and adoption, or termination of the pregnancy. Our providers can counsel and refer you to local resources depending on the outcome that you feel is best. All services and referrals are confidential.

I’m ready to start my first birth control pill pack. What do I need to know?

View our oral contraceptive pills handout for more information.

I forgot to take my pill. What do I do?

It’s important to take the pill at the same time every day, but sometimes things don’t always go according to plan. If you miss one pill, take it as soon as you remember and continue your regular pill schedule. If you miss two pills in a row, take two pills daily for two days, then finish the pack. If you miss three or more pills, start a new pill pack and expect breakthrough bleeding until your period starts. Use backup contraception.

What if I don’t like my birth control pills or want to switch to another type of contraception?

Unless your provider has told you otherwise, finish the package of pills before discontinuing them. If you are having unpleasant side effects, message your provider in your One Chart patient portal or call 402-472-5000 to speak to a nurse. You can usually switch to a different method of birth control at the end of your pack without any loss in contraceptive protection.

How do I get emergency contraception?

Emergency contraception (Plan B) is available for purchase at the University Health Center pharmacy. The sooner the medication can be taken, the more effective it is. If the health center pharmacy is closed or if you are out of town, most pharmacies carry Plan B.

I think I have a yeast infection. What do I do?

If you have vaginal itching and a thick white discharge, it’s best if you call 402-472-5000 and follow the prompts to speak with a nurse about your concern. Depending on your symptoms, the nurse may schedule an appointment for you at the medical clinic to discuss your concern with a provider. The health center pharmacy carries medicine that can help treat your yeast infection.